Gallery

Forest fragmentation effect upon bat assemblages in Central Amazon (Brazil)

As fragmentation is a landscape-scale phenomenon, the consequences of fragmentation on biodiversity are most appropriately assessed within a landscape framework. We will determine fragmentation effects within the greater landscape context and assess whether bat responses are related to a range of predictors describing landscape composition and configuration. By evaluating relationships between biotic response variables and landscape metrics both across different spatial scales and across time we will be able to more adequately address the complexity underlying bat responses to fragmentation than in previous studies on this issue.

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Social-ecological changes in Sibiloi National Park: an integrated inter-disciplinary approach (Kenya)

The overall objective of this research project is to establish a baseline to monitor ecological and cultural changes in Sibiloi National Park, while controlling for changes in the surroundings. Because of the notorious lack of comprehensive sources with which to assess change in the area, the establishment of a baseline remains paramount in order to monitor both current and future threats, as well as to provide the required information to optimize conservation efforts both within and outside the park, working together with the local communities.

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Bat and bird assemblages in humanized landscapes, Ranomafana National Park (Madagascar)

We investigate how Malagasy bird and bat assemblages are capable to persist across the island’s anthropocentric habitats. We’re also trying to understand the potential of insectivorous bats to suppress populations of agricultural insect pests.

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